April 12, 2010

Anyone dealt with So Cal dog rescue groups?

Just wondering if anyone has had experiences with the following groups, either positive or negative: Westside German Shepherd Rescue, Canine Adoption and Rescue League, Foreverhome Pet Rescue, Ventura County Humane Society, West Coast Mastiff and Large Breed Rescue, Southern California Labrador Retriever Rescue, Fetching Companions Labrador Rescue…I think that's it. Those are some of the groups in my area, and I was going to start looking in the Fall-but I have heard some groups deny for really silly reasons, and their volunteers are on power trips, etc. Any experiences would be great.
Two reasons I might be denied-we adopted 2 dogs from a badly run rescue before, but had to re-home them both.
Also, we have little kids, and I know some rescues have policies about little kids. Which is lame.

Rescue groups are like breeders - some are responsible, some are just trying to get dogs out of shelters without knowing anything about them. Most have a website with specific adoption requirements - if they say home visit required, they mean home visit required.

And ,yes, unfortunately there is politics and egos. Some people have seen so much neglect and cruelty they hate people and act unreasonably but most are just good hearted people looking for a safe, life-time, committed home for dogs. A few volunteers are on a power trip - but then you find that in breeders too.

You need to just move on and try working with another group. Each rescue is different so don't get scared off by stories - some are easy to work with and flexible, some are very inflexible and unpleasant, most are reasonable good people.

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Comments on Anyone dealt with So Cal dog rescue groups? »

April 10, 2010

Dog owner @ 3:32 am

Rescue groups are like breeders - some are responsible, some are just trying to get dogs out of shelters without knowing anything about them. Most have a website with specific adoption requirements - if they say home visit required, they mean home visit required.

And ,yes, unfortunately there is politics and egos. Some people have seen so much neglect and cruelty they hate people and act unreasonably but most are just good hearted people looking for a safe, life-time, committed home for dogs. A few volunteers are on a power trip - but then you find that in breeders too.

You need to just move on and try working with another group. Each rescue is different so don't get scared off by stories - some are easy to work with and flexible, some are very inflexible and unpleasant, most are reasonable good people.
References :
Experience in show and rescue. I work Siberian Husky and Cairn Terrier rescue with several 501C groups - each is different. Sorry I can't give you specific info on these particular groups.

Hard Hearted Hanna @ 4:33 am

My large black lab who became like a family member past away two years ago. I swore no more pets because it would be too painful to lose another. I picked up a BHG and flipping through it I stopped at a picture of a tiny white long haired dog. I cut it out and put it beside my picture of Groucho (our black lab in heaven).
3 months later I get an email from one of those rescue homes. It had a picture of a white dog just like the one I had been wanting and the title was "Would you adopt me?" I was stuck on that picture for about 10 min. He hadn't even been born yet. After filling out a questionnaire with questions like where would he sleep, eat, play and how would he be trained? I sounded like a momma with the first child which I would spoil. We had to pay $200 for all shots prenatal care neutering and all possible care when born and she wouldn't give them away until they were 6-8 weeks old. She sent me pictures of his first bath, playing with siblings and more. We put him in a bed right next to my side of bed. The lady admitted he was the runt of the litter but showed no signs of anything wrong. I said it anything goes wrong we have an excellent Vet and we know the animal emergency room well.
When we went to pick him up I knew right off which was mine. There was another small white dog but skiddish and stayed in the middle away from people.
Then there were two larger silver dogs that just sort of sniffed around with their noses in the air, and two brown silver dogs of same snotty attitude. Then there was this little fuzzy ball of joy bouncing around greeting everyone like "take me home" pant pant "I will love you forever" I told hubby that was our dog! sure enough the lady came up and asked me if I wanted the runt. Funny I nicknamed my youngest daughter Runt. Hubby whined about the cost until our baby had him laughing. HOOKED
took him home, he trained us well and we taught him using two word commands. or syllables such as out side? in side, the word treat works on all dogs in neighborhood. Paper training was a bit harder. I got more and more upset when he didn't go on the paper. I'd use toilet tissue to pick it up and showed him I was disappointed. The final straw came when I said "Bad!" sat down in the floor cleaning it up while he watched me confused, crying and whining about how hard he's making mommy work. Two more times of that and he used paper every time. It because easier to train him for outside because he knew he'd get a treat when he comes back in. Now every time I go he waits at the door jumping up and down until I take him outside. Poor doggy holds it all night until I get up.
His papers said his name was Mr. I. B. Barkley. We changed it just a bit because we live on Barclay Ave. So he is now Barclay. Sometimes he responds to his name other times it's good old "treat".
I'm long winded and could go on forever about the little white star that our big black Groucho picked from the sky, sent him down to me telling me to "shut up and leave him alone because he gave me what I want" :- "
Here's my advice to help you find the right agency.

Have a mushy woman fill out the SPCA being pretty specific about what you want.
They should through email hook you up with a reputable rescue home that has mostly your type of pets.
Fill out their form like you are talking about your first born child. That catches their eye.
Don't worry about staying in touch with her, you will get tons of email about what they have. Our neighbor across the street takes in large dogs and nurses them backed to health and its so much fun watching him take care of every single one of them.
Generally most Rescue homes take super care of their animals. Any cost goes towards the first weeks of care. Some of the reasons they deny are lack of compassion in you request, think about that first child, would you put it outside in a dog house? Train yourself. sleep anywhere it wants to. Tell her you had heard about pumpkin balls for pet could she explain more? I wouldn't tell them you are looking for a showdog, just say you need a loving companion for your family. etc…If it doesn't work out move on to another rescue center. You will get lots of emails for variety.
I've grown to love my little barclay so much that if I take a nap he sleeps across my stomach so that he knows when I get up. I would save my dog before I would any family member.
I worked with a rescue in the mountains of VA and she bought her dogs down to her sisters nearer the beach for pickup.
Good luck, I hope your pet teaches you what he wants. I'd swear mine has a human child's mind.
References :

GreyhoundAdopter @ 5:52 am

I can't tell you about these groups, but I am on the board of directors of a rescue group here in Michigan.

If you are not planning on adopting until the fall, you have lots of time to check out the groups. If you are looking to adopt a Labrador (I assume this because several of the groups you listed are breed specific) you can focus on a few groups near you. Labradors are a very common breed & I know our local shelters and rescue groups always have an ample supply of them.

You can also put your zip code in the search engine at Petfinder.com - they can zero in on any type of dog you are looking for.

As an adopter, it isn't necessary to worry about any of the rescue groups politics, or any volunteers personal agendas - just provide a dog with a safe, loving home.

The main purpose of all these groups is to find forever homes for the dogs. If you do not want to go through a screening process, then you need to adopt a dog from the local shelter or humane society … their requirements are usually not as strict.

With our group we require that dogs live INSIDE the home with the families that adopt them, they are never tied out in the yard on a chain.

We prefer that the people have a safely fenced yard, but do adopt to people that live in apartments, and that have homes without a fenced yard - as long as they agree to not ever let the dog run loose in a non-enclosed area. If an adopter lives in an apartment, we make 100% sure that the landlord is fine with them bringing a dog home to live in their complex.

We check references and speak with the adopters vet - make sure that their current pets are well cared for & up to date on all their vaccinations. We find out what happened to the adopters previous pets …. did they die of old age, were they hit by a car ?… etc. Did the adopter let them run loose and they ran away?

We want to place dogs in responsible homes …. none of our requirements are silly or out-of-line. Anyone who takes good basic care of their animals will breeze through the adoption process.

The home visit isn't at all about how clean your home is. It is about seeing if your home is safe, and meeting the other dogs/cats and people that live there. It is a sit down visit that we use to explain the special needs of any dog we are placing, and to make sure everyone in the family is in agreement on getting a dog.

If we see any safety concerns, we can let you know what you may need to do to prepare to bring your new dog home. If the dogs currently in the home appear to have medical or grooming issues (matted coats - nails growing back into their pads … etc) things showing that are not being cared for properly - we want to know these things. An over the phone interview can never replace going to the home where the dog will live.

If the adopter can not afford to properly care for the animals in their care now,
we most certainly would not place an additional dog in their care. You can tell a lot about a person by how well mannered and well-cared for their current dogs are.

If you are someone that in the past 10 years have had 2 dogs run away, a puppy die of Parvo, and had another of your dogs killed by being hit by a car or a history like this - it is very doubtful that any group would adopt to you. Why would they - a dog in this person's care has a death sentence!

Dogs that come through a rescue deserve to have as long a life as possible, in a loving home that will take the proper care of them. Most rescues will have their adoption requirements listed right on their websites.

In the end, it's all about the dogs.

Thank you for opening your heart up to rescue a dog. You will be paid back a hundred-fold in love by the dog you provide a home for!
References :
I approve adoptions, do home visits and call vet references for our rescue group.

Divapom @ 8:39 am

I have seen some bogus rescue groups. But the ones I have dealt with are reputable. They are committed to finding good, safe, loving, forever homes for their dogs. Many of these dogs have gone thru a lot and they don't want them to go thru anything negative in the future. So, some of those "silly reasons" they may deny someone for, are not all that silly. The home inspections are to ensure a safe, sanitary home. They don't really care if you are an immaculate housekeeper. What they do care about is that your home has secure fencing, and is not drowning in filth and feces from other pets. They also want to meet the future family, both human and animal.
The finance questions are to insure that you have the funds to care for the dog in case of emergencies. Many of their rescues were abandoned or neglected because of lack of money. They usually have a return clause and you are not allowed to rehome the dog to someone else, because they want to make sure their dogs are going to good homes.

I am sure that some people may have attitudes, but the majority of the volunteers I have met are kind and caring. They are looking out for the best interests of the dogs in their care. They may be short with people who have no clue, or that expect that just because they want one of their dogs, the rescue is obligated to hand it over. These volunteers have put a lot of time, money and emotion into rehabbing these dogs and only want the best for them in their new home

Don't go by what you have "heard" check out each rescue for yourself and make your own conclusions. If there is something negative you have heard about a particular rescue, of course be on the lookout for that, when you check them out
References :

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