April 13, 2010

Anyone else just given up on adopting from a rescue?

We're considering going through a rescue to adopt a dog this year. I've read it can be tricky, invasive, and that most rescues act like they really don't want to adopt their dogs. As a test, I sent an email to a group in my area, asking if they adopted out to families with young kids, under a year. It was for a LABRADOR rescue…you know, the country's number one family dog? Their application included questions like "Who are the people that frequently visit your home?" and "how close is the nearest dog park?" I can understand asking about the home and the family basics, but I'm not going to tell you about any guests that MAY come to my home. Do they think I'd mention it if I had my drug dealer stop by every week?
They had 13 dogs listed as theirs up for adoption, plus 4 others listed as well. Many dogs had the tag, "great with kids." I was told NOT A SINGLE LAB would be appropriate for my family. Just based on the age of my kid, we didn't even get to the invasive questions. Apparently everyone with a toddler is going to allow their child to use the dog as a jungle gym…please. I have some common sense.
I'm willing to bet these people grew up with dogs….they would deny my kids the chance to do the same. My husband is even more determined to avoid these places after our last bad experience with a so-called rescue. So I guess we're back to the shelter, hoping for an owner turn-in of a sweet lab mix because of financial issues, or Craigslist for another family "moving" or whatever. I don't think I can stomach the rescues! Anyone feel the same?
I'd expect (and welcome) a home check for a large breed, some questions about my family and lifestyle. But a shelter won't make me sign my life away to submit to a post-adoption checkup, or live in fear they'll try to take it if my housing situation changes-which actually isn't enforceable, anyway. In my experience, you need to have a home, a job, and a checkbook to adopt a shelter dog. They actually let you decide for yourself if your family is ready for a dog!! Imagine that!!! It just seems rescues contribute to the over-crowding problem. Lots of people they turn down end up buying dogs in the pet store, promoting puppy mills!
I don't see how an email literally asking "do you place dogs in homes with small kids" could POSSIBLY be misconstrued as having an attitude. Gee, I guess I must be crazy…thanks for proving me right!!!

Ugh….I can understand breed rescues wanting to make sure their animals go to a good home where they'll be taken care of, but a lot of them just go waaaay overboard with their demands and want to control everything long after you've adopted an animal.
I wanted to do what I thought was a good thing and give a needy dog a nice loving home, but they make it so unpleasant and tedious and drawn out and treat you like you're some kind of deviant with murderous motives….
And what the hell is up with the "home inspections"?
I thought it was just to make sure we actually had a fenced yard and that our place was doggy proofed and safe….
We have a small but very clean home with a spacious fenced yard.
We only had to go through one home inspection, and it was after that incredibly rude and ridiculous experience that I just wrote off bothering with anymore so called rescue agencies. Maybe it's just the few I dealt with, and I know I shouldn't be judgemental, but I'm now convinced they're all run by crazy neurotic people with severe paranoia and control issues.
The person that came to inspect my home went through my refrigerator! Wtf? She was diggin' all up in there like she was searching for a hidden crack pipe or something. She commented on the 2 beers that were in there, wanted to know how often we drink and how much. (We hardly ever drink and the 2 beers had been in there for at least 3 months, but I'm sure she was convinced we were alcoholics who get smashed on a daily basis and were anxiously waiting for her to give us a dog so we could force it to consume large amounts of beer too.)
She went through every room, and everything IN every room. I was already upset about her going into the fridge and touching everything, and then digging through my kids' toyboxes and claiming things in there weren't safe for dogs….ummm, it's not a damn DOGS toybox!? We were told we would have to get rid of some of the kids toys! LOL!
My 6 yo daughter has an extensive (and expensive) collection of Littlest Pet Shop critters. They're her favorite toys….too bad! A dog can choke to death on them!
Puhleeeze!
The inspection was cut short and ended when I told her to forget it and asked her to leave after she actually walked through our bedroom closet and THEN started to open drawers in my dresser.
I mean, get real, wtf is the point in that? Checking to make sure my panties are dog friendly?
I don't know if those things were actually on the checklist or whatever for her to "inspect" or if she was a sick pervert or just a nosey b**ch, but her actions ruined ALL rescues for me.

I went to Craigslist and found an awesome puppy there that was actually in need of a home and I don't have to worry about any paranoid controlling women showing up at my door unannounced (for up to TWO YEARS!) to "check up on the dog."
I paid $40 for my puppy, not anywhere near the amount of $ that I would have spent to "rescue."

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Comments on Anyone else just given up on adopting from a rescue? »

April 10, 2010

zookiee22 @ 10:38 pm

I have seen people have these troubles more and more often…
just sad.
hang in there. you will get your fur baby.
good luck
References :

Fiore @ 10:41 pm

Get a dog from a shelter… shelter dogs are in real need of a good home. Screw the adoption agency… their dogs are obviously not in need of a home right away. Let them struggle with finding "foster" homes for these poor dogs while they pretend to care. You can also call local Animal Hospitals and ask them if they have any dogs for adoption or any info….they usually do.
References :
Vet Tech

scoutma53 @ 10:42 pm

What a strange "rescue"! No labs available for people with kids!! However I should warn you that Shelters also have a fairly thorough questionnaire. I have done it several times.
References :

?JD? @ 10:44 pm

You should definatly keep trying Craigslist. YOu should check with the nearest cities that are big and cities that have a military base. Soldiers are always PCSing and looking for homes for their beloved pets. I put up a post looking for an adult Shihtzu before and got many responses.

I tried getting a yorkie from a rescue but they wanted 850.00 for a yorkie that had health problems. Rescues can be ridiculous.
References :

?Future Klee Kai Owner!? @ 10:49 pm

What a weird situation from a rescue. Are there any more rescues in your area? I agree, a lot of rescues are really just too much.

YES. Go to your local shelter, I can pretty much guarantee you that there's a loving lab/lab mix there in need of a home; the lab/lab mixes, right up there with the pit bulls, are the breed most commonly found in shelters.

To find a great lab, try petfinder.com, they really help when it comes to rescuing.
References :

Foon X @ 10:51 pm

It may not have just been your family. It could be the dogs they have are easily agitated, play ruff, or don't like small children. These would all be reasons to deny you, but the fault not being placed on your side. "Great with kids." may mean good with a typical 10 year old.

Maybe they don't mean every individual that comes into your house, but ages and genders. Some dogs may be afraid of men or women, or may roughhouse to much for the elderly or small children.

I do believe that you wouldn't let your kids do that. Growing up we were also taught to respect animals space, but soo many kids today their parents just let them do anything.

If you do get your dog from craigslist or an ad I would insist on any medical records from the vet. I've heard some horror stories about people getting dogs with bad health problems from there.

I hope you can get a wonderful dog from the shelter. Good luck
References :

Mary C @ 11:02 pm

I have NO experience with rescue groups — tho' I once adopted a Greyhound through a local fellow, but he was more of a 'broker' or Greyhound 'smuggler' than a rescue person. But here's what I think about your experience with the rescue people…Like everyone else, they are skittish about liability. If one of their rescue dogs injures a small child, the parents would be eager to sue! Ditto visitors to the home! That's why they have so many questions regarding visitors to the home, nor do they want to place a dog where there is a small child — or a small child visiting the home.

Of course you have good sense regarding your baby and a dog in the home! My kids were raised with dogs and cats; my grandchildren DO use their Chocolate Lab as a 'jungle gym.' No problem!

Here's what I would do…If you want a rescue dog, just answer the questions as the asker wants — no small kids in the home; no small kids visiting the home; only sedate adults who frequent the dog park.

Good luck with your pooch!
References :

Dog owner @ 11:03 pm

I'm sorry you had this experience. I've heard the story before and even though I worked for a national terrier rescue, there were some applicants turned down I did not agree with so I helped them find rescues they could work with. And they have all been wonderful owners and yes, young children were often the "issue", but if they have already been a successful owner as well as parent … I don't always agree with the judgement. I had an absolute fit when a committee back east who never met the applicants refused an applicant who a very responsible breeder backed and knew well. This type of bad experience only hurts all rescues.

Some rescuers have lost all touch with reality - actually started hating people so no one is good enough, but many are very reasonable. Please don't give up because of one group. One can run into the same thing with breeders - some go overboard, some are reasonable.

You might also look at responsible breeders - they sometimes have re-home dogs - dogs that didn't work in show and hate kennel life or dogs that were responsibly returned - usually for changes in life reasons.

Good Luck.
References :
40 yrs experience as show, sled, rescue and dog education.

April 11, 2010

Shannon @ 12:19 am

Ugh….I can understand breed rescues wanting to make sure their animals go to a good home where they'll be taken care of, but a lot of them just go waaaay overboard with their demands and want to control everything long after you've adopted an animal.
I wanted to do what I thought was a good thing and give a needy dog a nice loving home, but they make it so unpleasant and tedious and drawn out and treat you like you're some kind of deviant with murderous motives….
And what the hell is up with the "home inspections"?
I thought it was just to make sure we actually had a fenced yard and that our place was doggy proofed and safe….
We have a small but very clean home with a spacious fenced yard.
We only had to go through one home inspection, and it was after that incredibly rude and ridiculous experience that I just wrote off bothering with anymore so called rescue agencies. Maybe it's just the few I dealt with, and I know I shouldn't be judgemental, but I'm now convinced they're all run by crazy neurotic people with severe paranoia and control issues.
The person that came to inspect my home went through my refrigerator! Wtf? She was diggin' all up in there like she was searching for a hidden crack pipe or something. She commented on the 2 beers that were in there, wanted to know how often we drink and how much. (We hardly ever drink and the 2 beers had been in there for at least 3 months, but I'm sure she was convinced we were alcoholics who get smashed on a daily basis and were anxiously waiting for her to give us a dog so we could force it to consume large amounts of beer too.)
She went through every room, and everything IN every room. I was already upset about her going into the fridge and touching everything, and then digging through my kids' toyboxes and claiming things in there weren't safe for dogs….ummm, it's not a damn DOGS toybox!? We were told we would have to get rid of some of the kids toys! LOL!
My 6 yo daughter has an extensive (and expensive) collection of Littlest Pet Shop critters. They're her favorite toys….too bad! A dog can choke to death on them!
Puhleeeze!
The inspection was cut short and ended when I told her to forget it and asked her to leave after she actually walked through our bedroom closet and THEN started to open drawers in my dresser.
I mean, get real, wtf is the point in that? Checking to make sure my panties are dog friendly?
I don't know if those things were actually on the checklist or whatever for her to "inspect" or if she was a sick pervert or just a nosey b**ch, but her actions ruined ALL rescues for me.

I went to Craigslist and found an awesome puppy there that was actually in need of a home and I don't have to worry about any paranoid controlling women showing up at my door unannounced (for up to TWO YEARS!) to "check up on the dog."
I paid $40 for my puppy, not anywhere near the amount of $ that I would have spent to "rescue."
References :

anne b @ 7:12 am

I think you have a lot to learn about rescue and the horrific situation these dogs are in nowadays.

First of all, they ask those questions that were offensive to you because the dog needs exercise, and any one of those guests who come to your house could let the dog out the front door to be hit by a car. When a volunteer spends their own precious free time to rehabilitate and get a dog ready for adoption, do you think they want to hear that the dog was hit by a car?

They ask those questions because how do you think these poor animals ended up in rescue to begin with? Because they were in responsible homes? Not!

The goal here is to make sure the next home is the forever home. No one wants a dog to be a ping pong ball for its life because the home did not measure up and the attitude was bad.

True, you can get a dog from the shelter, who does very little screening, but many dogs adopted from shelters are returned very quickly simply because the home was not suitable or the family was not good at dog ownership.

Your attitude is most probably what got you denied. Anyone who is not interested in the well-being of the dog and thinks it is their right to have a dog gets a denial letter from me also. I don't spend all my free time to care for and adopt out dogs just because someone wants one.
And those people who aren't sincere about their intentions and buy from a pet store? Well, their dogs end up with us, too, because they weren't suitable for dog ownership and they dumped their little purchase at the shelter for us to deal with.

You need to do some research before you throw stones. If you had been the least bit understanding, you may have gotten the help and support of an awesome person in rescue.
References :
Work in rescue. Adopt out dogs all the time to people who are genuine and caring.

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