Is Owning a Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever Risky?

So my family is finally planning on getting a Labrador or golden retriever from a breeder. But after researching a bit i saw lot of negative info on their health risks. Are they really that risky in health problems such as hip dysplasia or eye problems?

I think im just scaring myself but im still kind of worried about the risks.

also if you’ve had healthy dogs what are some tips to keep them like that?

Its good that you are aware of the potential health problems in the breeds that you are interested in- now you can search for breeders who make sure to breed dogs without these health problems.
The sad fact is- most of these health problems are congenital- that is, they are passed on through poor breeding practices. They are easily avoidable- all it takes is a few tests. If the dogs dont pass the tests, they arent bred with.
It costs a fair amount of money for dogs to get him scored, elbow scored, eye tested, etc (depending on the health problems in the breed) and as a result, pups become more expensive to help pay for the cost of testing the parents.

To avoid these risks? Choose a good, reputable breeder who health screens their dogs before they breed with them. Research into hip dysplasia, luxating patella, etc- find out what tests and what scores the parents of your new puppy should have, and make sure that you choose a pup produced from healthy dogs.
If you choose a good breeder, the pup will cost more (but dont be fooled, there are plenty of bad breeders who also put high prices on puppies) but it should come with a health guarentee, with papers stating the dog’s lineage, etc, etc.
Grill the breeder to make sure that you are getting a quality pup.

Hip dysplasia can also be caused by overexercising dogs before they are fully grown, so making sure not to walk your puppy for too long, not make him jump hurdles, etc until he is 18 months old or so will also significantly decrease his chances of developing hip problems that are not genetic.

5 Responses to “Is Owning a Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever Risky?”

  1. Mary says:

    Look for a breeder that performs OFA testing on the hips and elbows, and CERF testing on the eyes. If your breeder has tested the parents for these health issues, that will reduce the chance that your puppy could develop problems in those areas down the road.

    Just remember, breeders that do this sort of testing charge more than backyard breeders, but it’s better to pay now than pay much more later if/when the dog has health problems.
    References :

  2. Daniel says:

    Well isn’t everything risky with animals? of course something can happen to the dog but then again something can happen to you. don’t look to much into it but make sure that the bloodline doesn’t have any genetic diseases and you should be fine.

    Tips: keep to a certain brand and make sure that your family have the mental strength to actually discipline a dog. Because otherwise the dog will be the master and you will be the pet.
    References :

  3. B!nd! says:

    Its good that you are aware of the potential health problems in the breeds that you are interested in- now you can search for breeders who make sure to breed dogs without these health problems.
    The sad fact is- most of these health problems are congenital- that is, they are passed on through poor breeding practices. They are easily avoidable- all it takes is a few tests. If the dogs dont pass the tests, they arent bred with.
    It costs a fair amount of money for dogs to get him scored, elbow scored, eye tested, etc (depending on the health problems in the breed) and as a result, pups become more expensive to help pay for the cost of testing the parents.

    To avoid these risks? Choose a good, reputable breeder who health screens their dogs before they breed with them. Research into hip dysplasia, luxating patella, etc- find out what tests and what scores the parents of your new puppy should have, and make sure that you choose a pup produced from healthy dogs.
    If you choose a good breeder, the pup will cost more (but dont be fooled, there are plenty of bad breeders who also put high prices on puppies) but it should come with a health guarentee, with papers stating the dog’s lineage, etc, etc.
    Grill the breeder to make sure that you are getting a quality pup.

    Hip dysplasia can also be caused by overexercising dogs before they are fully grown, so making sure not to walk your puppy for too long, not make him jump hurdles, etc until he is 18 months old or so will also significantly decrease his chances of developing hip problems that are not genetic.
    References :

  4. Alex says:

    no not really. i have a golden retriever and shes 6 right now and has no problems. the way i keep healthy is by feeding her blue buffalo. its really healthy and doesn’t have all that crap in it like pedigree or Purina. i also exercise her and play with her so she doesn’t get fat. heres the website http://www.bluebuffalo.com/sample/true-blue-results.php?kw=bluebuff.com&gclid=CIeexricvaUCFUPu7Qodrw8UXg you can compare the different dog food brands. well good luck!
    References :

  5. MS says:

    Do your due diligence. Look for a certified breeder. Speak to some of their clients from year gone by. Breeding has become a very lucrative business, so yes, there are instances of issues but if you do your homework you should be fine

    We owned a yellow lab and she was the best. She had some allergies but so do our kids, so I wouldn’t blame it on the breeder.

    Exercise your dog, look after their teeth, keep their ears clean (especially if you let them play in water) - feed them good food - and you will have many joyful years together.
    References :
    http://www.allaboutgoldenretrievers.info

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